Kirin
  • Kirin

Kirin

$20,000.00

Kirin in Japanese Kana (syllabary) means giraffe, but in Kanji (Chinese characters), it means an imaginary animal in Japan. The design is drawn for the popular imaginary animal as everybody can see on the Kirin beer bottles.

Kirin includes” Ki” as a female and “rin” as a male. The body is like a horse, while its look is like a dragon, and only male has a horn.  Kirin, animal gods represent Justice for good people and it is considered an omen of good luck.

Kirin in Japanese Kana (syllabary) means giraffe, but in Kanji (Chinese characters), it means an imaginary animal in Japan. The design is drawn for the popular imaginary animal as everybody can see on the Kirin beer bottles.

Kirin includes” Ki” as a female and “rin” as a male. The body is like a horse, while its look is like a dragon, and only male has a horn.  Kirin, animal gods represent Justice for good people and it is considered an omen of good luck.

Here is a rarely known story about the100 year old Kirin on the beer bottles, as the label was originally designed by Rokkaku Shisui, (1867-1950) a Maki-e master of Matsuda Gonroku when he was still a starving art student of Tokyo Fine Art School. He was asked by his friend to do it for making some money, and he did. Strangely, the author never talked about this to anyone nor left any written record about this. On the other hand, The headquarter of Kirin Beer also said that they could not find anyone who designed the label until 1961 when Ishikuro Keishichi in his book “A tale of beer” said that his father-in-law, Rokkaku Shisui was asked by the beer company and designed the label for only five yen.

The techniques and materials used by the author, Masanori Omote san are abundant. Taka Maki-e is used on the Kirin’s body and Shishiai Togidashi Maki-e on their faces.

Platinum powder is used on the tails and the wave crest. On the cap he uses Taka Maki-e and Kirigane (rectangular gold foil) and Marugane (round shape gold foil) for the cloud all over, a masterpiece.

MK-31

Specific References